I sneaked backstage at a fashion show!

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Ever felt the urge to break into the backstage of a fashion show and see what on earth goes on behind that runway? Well, worry no more-I’ve done it for you. And I didn’t get caught.

Behind the scenes; behind the spotlight

As some of you already know, for the past few months, I’ve been working for Korea Style Week, which is the more accessible, B2B(buyer-to-buyer) version of Seoul Fashion Week. This season’s Style Week took place in COEX(in Gangnam, Seoul) a few days ago, and I was invited(obviously, I worked for them). I’ve been to Korea Style Week a few times before, once two years ago having to sneak out during class to see the Korean designer Ko Tae yong (see post by young Konni about it here). I’ve evolved a lot since then, since I no longer have to sneak around to go to fashion events lest people should mock (everyone close to me now is very supportive of my fashion career). BUT on Sunday, I had the chance to feel that tingling feeling of secretly tiptoeing around to get a more intimate glimpse into fashion. I sneaked backstage during the Korea Style Week runway show!

I figured if I got caught I could pull out the ‘I worked for the Korea Style Week blog!’ card, although I think even so I wasn’t supposed to actually go backstage during the fashion shows.

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(this was the entrance.)

Okay, deep breath, I tell myself. This is going to be a fun adventure! I’ll just keep exploring until I get kicked out. After all, no one in the fashion world succeeds by following the rules, if there even are any, right? The moment I entered, I just saw a bunch of makeup artists lounging around with their phones, looking pretty bored. I walked past them, nodding and smiling as if to say ‘yeah, I’m just one of you guys, keep working, don’t mind me!’ (They stared for a while, probably because judging from my shortness and chubbiness they made out that I wasn’t one of the models, but I didn’t look chic enough to be one of the designers, so who was I? But they turned back to their phones.)

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(backstage. succeeded in entering without looking too weird.)

The first thing I noticed backstage was the models. Oh what beautiful, unrealistic creatures models are.

No matter how lovely, unique, or bursting with personality a model is, there’s one collective aura that they all share in common, and that’s the aura of intimidation. Even though it’s not the first time I’ve talked to a real live one(yes, the nuance IS that they’re a different species) I can’t help but give away my nervousness in the subtle tremor of my voice or my awkward smile as I ask for them to pose for a photo. Physical traits do certainly influence human interaction, I think, as I bend my knees, tilting my head to eye those long limbs through an old Canon Rebel.

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(models running around in heels, backstage. pretty artistic shot, no?)

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(It was scary to even ask them to pose; they were all at least 20cms taller than me in those heels)

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(a model making sure she’s ready to get on stage. I wonder how it would feel to look in the mirror when you’re a model. I wonder if they look at themselves and take their bodies apart, criticizing themselves for their physical flaws like most of us do.)

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Overall it was pretty hectic; after all, the main objective here is to GET THE MODELS ON STAGE, ON TIME, LOOKING FLAWLESS. No one really payed much attention to me because they were all busy doing their own thing, playing their part to keep the show running. It’s not as glamorous a process as I thought it would be.

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(the runway seems a lot more accessible and familiar from this perspective. Just a few stairs and you’re on the magical fashion pedestal.)

When the models are all lined up and the show starts to heat up, it gets quieter backstage because everyone’s so focused on monitoring the show. The director was constantly running to and fro, waving a bunch of papers with the show schedule and details around. She had a pretty intense look on her face, and she was busy talking to each person about precisely what they were supposed to do at exactly what time.

But of course, none of this frenzy is reflected on the actual runway. All we usually get to see is the models calmly doing the catwalk, looking like they’ve got their stuff together.

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(The outfits were colorful and totally weird, but I like weird.)

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(and then there are the people that have to sit and take care of all the digital stuff, lighting, sound, photography etc.)

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After getting a few shots of the models and the people that do all the digital, techno-work (bless those people! no one ever seems to notice them but they work so hard to put important parts of the fashion show together), I wandered around to observe everything else.

A box filled with ‘밥버거'(rice burgers; a pretty popular snack/meal here in Korea. They’re literally burgers with rice instead of bread.) at the entrance raised my eyebrows; I thought models didn’t eat fatty foods, especially during show season. But then a scene from The September Issue where a pin-thin model cheekily looks at the camera during a shoot and eats pie(pie! The ultimate carb-filled, gluten-loaded, evil food! I’m being sarcastic.) comes to mind, reminding me that we’re all human and should all be let off the hook to eat whatever we want sometimes. (And I enjoyed that thought as I munched on my Burger King burger after the show. I have an unhealthy relationship with their long chicken burger.)

I was trying to get a shot of the rice burgers to show you guys when I was interrupted by something much more intriguing-A BACKSTAGE MODEL FIGHT! Well, okay, it wasn’t a fight, it was just a conflict. But I was still excited. I witnessed a model surrounded by girls, shouting to another model across the corridor about something related to the sequence that they were supposed to do on the runway. The atmosphere turned from hectic and lively to serious-mode, and I heard some of the staff trying to figure out what to do with the runway sequence. “We can’t have the lights turn off without the model on stage!”, I remember the stage director saying. I’d imagined model fights to be much more physical or loud, but from my experience(of sitting around on the big black electric sound boxes(amplifiers?) for an hour or so-yeah, I know, such a foundation to judge) conflicts backstage were more…civilized.

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Amid the messy stacks of clothes and hangers and personal belongings of staff members, there was another large group of humans, other than models, that intimidated me. The designers. These were the people that I was actually dying to talk to, rather than the models. I love talking to people about their creative process and inspiration for their craft; believe me, talking to someone about their art really reveals a lot about a person’s life values and perspectives. However, as busy as they were, they looked so immersed in the show, making sure their creations were properly represented to the public eye, that I just couldn’t get myself to pop their ‘bubble’ of concentration. What I did get to to, though, was ask a designer for a photo and exchange blog addresses! Hopefully I’ll get to properly have a separate conversation with her soon.

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(designers dress fabulously, obviously.)

As thrilling and exciting being backstage a fashion show is, sneaking around gets exhausting after a while. I went out to enjoy the many exhibitions by brands.

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A brand called LUVX seemed to be the main show here. They had a giant, weird booth in the middle of the whole exhibition hall and are actually pretty well-known among younger Koreans, considering the fact that I’ve seen their designs before, and I’m usually the last person to know about new hot Korean brands that idols are seen wearing.

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Walking around on my favorite dirty old pair of Skechers, I saw some designs (and people) that I really liked.

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(She caught my eye because she was tan, unlike most Korean fashion-conscious people these days (everyone here dotes on the classic pale Asian face), and because she had mint-blue highlights on the hair beneath her ears.

“So you’re here all day?”

“Yeah, you can take shifts but I don’t have a partner here so I’ve taken care of this booth each day, all day.”

“Isn’t it hard?”

“It’s doable. But don’t take pictures too close up; I haven’t got any makeup on.”)

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(I have no idea what ‘IRONY PORN’ means and, honestly, I really don’t want to find out)

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(model off duty!)

Overall, last Sunday was a glorious day filled with fun, thrill, and awe…which left me with sore feet and utter exhaustion (I’m usually a total insomniac but I fell straight asleep after coming home from Korea Style week), but that’s okay because it was a meaningful experience, both in terms of my fashion career and my life as a whole.

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And speaking of my fashion career, I’ve started working on my eBay partnership this week!

Wouldn’t be possible without you readers. I love you!

Interview with the editor of Pictorial Project: How she created the biggest fashion project of Korea

My 6 centimeter heels pounding on the hot pavement of the thriving Apgujeong neighborhood in Gangnam with its upbeat music blasting out of clothing stores on every block, I frantically adjusted my tattered plaid blouse and military-style jacket, cursing as I tried to wipe a smudge of Nesquik chocolate milk off my tights. I remember muttering “Oh **** Konni stop being so unprofessional,” every two minutes as I ran into a small path packed with indie clothing stores and Korean makeup shops and finally got to Coffee Arco, where I was supposed to meet Dahee Jung, the editor of the Korean fashion magazine Pictorial Project. (For those of you that don’t know, Pictorial Project is Korea’s biggest independent fashion photography project magazine.)

Having taken two crazy taxi rides to get there straight after class, my once neatly-combed hair was looking like a mound of garden weed and I could feel my makeup clinging off my sweat(gross, I know. Note to self-please, please bring a mirror to next interview meeting). Anyhow, I had gotten there, and as I took a deep breath and scanned the vintage-style cafe for the slim, dressed-in-black, mysterious-looking, twenty-something Pictorial Project magazine editor I had met back at the 5th Korea Style Week, I saw her in the corner, reading the latest issue of Avenue magazine with a cold latte in hand.

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Absolutely stunning.

In her 4th year of university, she’s already the editor of a fashion magazine.

Unlike me, Dahee ‘unni’(a Korean term used when a girl refers to an older girl) was calm and poised, and I thought, “That’s how I wanna be when I go to university”-chic, independent, and open to new talent and new ideas(in this case, myself, as a young fashion blogger in the Korean fashion scene). Clumsily taking out my papers and voice recorder, I smiled nervously and started to ask Dahee unni about Pictorial Project and her fashion career journey.

“I knew I loved fashion, but I was skeptical of whether I had any real talent, so I made Pictorial Project to test my limits.”

PP was born in 2013 on Facebook! Dahee unni got together with about 40 people on Facebook who were interested in her personnel recruit post. Hearing this, I obviously had to ask-HOW? Unni, how did you get 40 people to work for your project when you were completely new to the industry? To this she replied, “Although we have an overflow of fashion projects right now, at the time there weren’t many project group businesses in the fashion field to begin with, so we had a fresher approach. I thought, ‘There must be other people out there with dreams similar to mine who are looking for that certain confirmation to carry on.’ ” What I found interesting about Pictorial Project as a magazine is that it didn’t actually start out as a magazine! Yup, that’s right-it wasn’t supposed to be a magazine, but rather a collection of photos that Dahee unni and her team of friends had worked on. Literally, a ‘Pictorial’ ‘Project’.

“And then we started to get offers from bookstores like Kyobo(the biggest bookstore line in Korea) that wanted to sell our stuff,”

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Volume 4 of Pictorial Project recently got completely sold out in bookstores in Korea, and now Pictorial Project is on a two-month renewal in order to provide their readers with even more artistic goodness. When I asked about it, Dahee unni calmly explained that ever since the start of Pictorial Project, so many other project-based fashion groups have been on the rise, and all of them have started converging toward the same theme and the same goal. After the 2-moth renewal period, Pictorial Project will be back with Volume 5, and there will be more copies for a wider range of readers(D:”My original targeted reader base was people already working in the field, but most of our actual sales are made by high school or university students who are pursuing a future in the fashion industry.”), and start being distributed as a web-zine too. However, the original overall style of the magazine will not be changing any time soon, says Dahee unni- “Pictorial Project doesn’t really have one main style. We’re just a mix of a bunch of things from different designers and photographers, and as a team we’re all about respecting everyone’s individuality. I think it’s what makes us unique!”

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“FASHION X ART: We care about artistic sensitivity, more than anything.

“We focus on blending fashion and art together, rather than just showing readers what the latest trend is and what they should wear this season. I guess you could say we literally are more of a pictorial than an actual fully-functioning magazine. Also, we don’t usually work with brands or designers that are already super-famous. We work mainly with independent designers that are new to the fashion scene, to give them a platform to showcase their work.”

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‘What if a vegetarian works at the butcher’s?’

“I try to create fresh, original images based on the most random, craziest ideas. For example, one day I might wake up and think, ‘What if a vegetarian works at the butcher’s?’ and voila, there’s my next photoshoot. But then again I must admit that you can never truly create images that people have never ever seen before; different images go round and round and we see similar things again and again like with trends. It’s just a new individual perspective on the image.”

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Dahee unni at work

“Passion pay”

a Korean term to describe receiving little or no pay for one’s work;

a term recently increasingly used to describe the Korean fashion industry

“I used to get a few people here and there being worried for my future, questioning how I was going to make money with just fashion. The fashion industry is infamous for being tough; lots of people start off at the bottom of the ladder and get paid measly amounts of money. ‘Passion pay’ in Korea was also recently a huge issue… but I don’t think anyone around me really was totally against me working in the fashion industry. Everyone that knows me knows I’m an energetic, active person who likes to roam around and work.”

Near the end of our interview, we shared a lot of ideas about the Korean fashion industry (since we’re both a part of it). I couldn’t help but nod enthusiastically, once again realizing the importance of having a clear outlook on the fashion industry to be successful in it. She said, I think the Korean fashion industry is the most interesting in the world. We’re so extremely sensitive to the latest trends and what other people are wearing, so people tend to consume fashion extremely fast, even though we’re not even one of the 5 major global fashion districts. The problem here is that when people consume fast, they’re also quick to throw clothes away. So many people buy cheap clothes from indie brands or street stores and get rid of them when they go out of style. No one seems to wear anything for a long time, like people used to do in the past.”

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“You mean magazines like Vogue, Cosmo, Elle, and W?”

Dahee unni sipped the last of her iced latte, smiling with her eyes, as I asked her about her views on mainstream magazines. I was genuinely curious of what someone who ran an artistic, individuality-based magazine would think of magazines that are targeted toward a more ‘popular’ and trend-based audience. Dahee unni was surprisingly very positive about all types of magazines, and I listened in awe, thinking ‘that’s how I want to be when I grow up’.

ME: “The fashion industry, especially the magazine sector, is under fire for promoting unrealistic body images and lookism standards, and I sometimes have friends that look down on fashion magazines because of their ‘lack of quality content’. What’s your stance on the whole issue?”

DAHEE UNNI: “You mean magazines like Vogue, Cosmopolitan, Elle, and W? I used to buy them and read through them when I was a kid and it would be really confusing. I would read a column in Vogue and be like, ‘the parade of a facade of luxury based on the latest trend which is… err what?’ And then I’d pick up a Cosmo and it would have so many different articles about different topics from celebrity gossip to a sophisticated piece on traditional Chanel eyeliner on the Paris runway and I’d never know what to read. But my thoughts changed completely after becoming an editor of a magazine myself. I began to understand fashion magazines properly. I think that while Vogue tends to stick to a certain concept or theme, Cosmopolitan also has it’s own style and it’s own story to tell. Every magazine shows what they can express best, and sometimes that just happens to be in line with modern beauty standards or the latest trends. And plus, there are lots of types of magazines… If you’re still young and need to read Vogue Girl but you’re reading Avenue, then you’re not really going to get much out of it. Similarly, if you want to see alternative artsy styles, you don’t look for it in Cosmopolitan.”

ME: “Hmm. That’s actually a really interesting point of view. So you don’t think there are any drawbacks with current..mainstream magazines?”

DAHEE UNNI: “Well, as a person who reads about five different magazines every month, I think there’s definitely a situation where each magazine is failing to be unique. Magazines that are more commercial tend to all have similar content, like what the latest trends are, how to get the guy/girl, what the latest beauty tips and tricks are, etc. I reckon it’s because magazines nowadays are desperate to fill up quantity, to make it sell.”

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The Pictorial Project team working on a photoshoot

“You’re doing it wrong, you’re going to fail,”

To wrap up the interview, I asked Dahee unni for a bit of personal advice on how to make in the fashion world.

ME: “Since I go to a foreign language high school, some around me are surprised when I tell them I’m going to be a fashion magazine editor because it’s an uncommon dream for someone in my situation. Some people even tell me not to pursue fashion! What should I do?”

DAHEE UNNI: “I think that times have changed A LOT since the last generation. People used to have to follow the ‘regular’ route to success, and if they worked hard enough, everything would work out fine. But that’s really not the case anymore. We’re in an era where success isn’t determined by the amount of effort you put into following the traditional path to success; it just simply cannot be determined. There are too many variables in today’s society. The line between professionals and non-professionals is unclear, and talent is everywhere. For example, to become a fashion magazine editor, you used to have to start from the bottom of the fashion industry, doing basic labor, and become an assistant, and then if any slots were open for writers you’d work hard again to become a writer, and ultimately an editor. But I didn’t do that-I just did my own thing, even though people would often tell me, ‘you’re doing it wrong, you’re going to fail.’ I think that in today’s world, you need to do what you love because it’s not going to work any other way. If you do something you don’t truly love, you’re going to be beaten by the people who are in that field of work because they really love it and are competent. Plus, I’d personally say ‘do what you love, and money will come naturally.’ ”

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Back to the start: I first met Pictorial Project at the 5th Korea Style Week.

They had a partnership with Korea Style Week and their own booth.

Thank you to Pictorial Project and Dahee unni : )

Talking to Korean fashion people in a cafe: An honest look inside the newly arising fashion scene

I take a few deep breaths and inhale the sugary warmth of the two-story Gangnam Pascucci cafe. Pulse throbbing in my ear, heartbeat racing through me, I sit in front of four models, two stylists, and a photographer. In my head I’m repeating my all-time mantra(which has never worked but I still do it anyways); keep cool, keepcool, keepcool oh forgodssakekeepcool! I have never really been a cool-looking, laid back person (type A humans I feel ya), and the situation of having these seven gorgeous, successful human beings before me, within two meters of my vicinity, is making my cheeks flush a deeper, embarrassing shade of vermillion-crimson.

And hey, no judging – being a fashion blogger doesn’t mean I don’t still get overexcited and nervous whenever I meet awesome, influential (and not to mention- major heartthrob material) people! Plus, these people aren’t your average fashionistas, they’re the new bomb of Korean fashion, and they’re already impressing people all over the country with their independent photoshoots, individual styles, and penetrating insights on the industry.

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Meet the emerging heroes of the Korean fashion scene, the popular Korean fashion group, Alexandergrupe. Continue reading

The story of how I fell asleep and missed my interview with Pixie Lott

Hey readers,

I feel like, because it’s hard to find an avid fashion blogger my age in Korea, lots of people tend to think I must be an incredibly amazing blogger. The thing is, whether I’m interviewing America’s Next Top Model models, hosting collaboration projects, or talking to magazine editors, I slip up a lot. And I mean A LOT.

For example, the other day I was supposed to be interviewing Pixie Lott, but I FELL ASLEEP AND MISSED IT.

Yep, you read that correctly. I just literally could not attend the online webinar BECAUSE I WAS FRIGGIN SLEEPING. IN MY BED. And this is THE PIXIE LOTT we’re talking ’bout here.

So here’s what happened. Recently I found a blogger community newsletter in my heap of emails. There was a link to attend the online Q&A session with Pixie Lott, hosted by the brand Magnitone. Of course, being a Pixie Lott fan, I applied. As I waited in anxiety and anticipation, I received an email informing me that I’d made it; that I’d been chosen to participate in the exclusive live webinar session with Pixie Lott. At that point I could practically imagine the looks of utter shock and admiration on people’s faces when they found out about it. Tingling with excitement, I posted this on facebook.

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And people were in awe, as I’d expected.

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I was too busy basking in the glory of being the first person among my friends to be able to exclusively interview someone as famous as Pixie Lott, that at first I did not realize that the Q&A session was in three hours. I was probably the last person put on the list.

I honestly freaked out when I read the words ‘Reminder: the exclusive Q&A session with Pixie Lott is in three hours(4AM)!’ in my business inbox. I’d been studying at school until 10PM that day, I was tired, I needed a shower and a nice few hours of sound sleep. A short internal conflict occurred in my head-should I stay up until 4AM and talk to Pixie Lott, or should I just forget it and get some sleep? After a split second, I decided that the former would definitely have to happen, because, who knows, this could be my big break, right? You never know in the blogging world.

So I drank my coffee, washed my face, and sat at my desk to prepare myself for the painful three hours of cruel, wearisome waiting in anticipation and irritation from severe sleep deprivation that were to come. I did everything to keep myself awake. After all, I couldn’t let my readers(you guys) down, and my friends were counting on me to nail this Q&A session and tell them all about it.

AND THEN guess what I did. I got a little drowsy, so I thought, ‘just 5 minutes…yes…I’ll just close my eyes for just, just…5 minutes’, and then I WENT TO MY BED. Now there’s one thing you need to know about my bed-it’s the coziest, softest, most sleep-inducing patch of space on planet Earth. It’s truly a fine bed. And as I lay down, I kept telling myself, ‘Everything will be fine… I’m sure I’ll get up before 4…’ BUT NO.

NO, NO, NO. JUST. NO. I DID NOT get up before 4. In fact I did not get up at all until the clock struck 7:10 AM. I opened my eyes, got straight up, stared at the clock, rubbed my eyes, then stared some more. The clock definitely said 7:10. I panicked for a while, even thinking, ‘well..well…maybe the webinar isn’t over! Maybe I’ll still get to talk to Pixie…’ But I regained my logical thinking skills, muttered some bad language about how I was such an idiot(WHICH I WAS), and went back to bed, because, you know, maybe it was just a big bad dream(which it wasn’t).

And that’s my story of how I almost, just almost, interviewed Pixie Lott. My friends were totally bummed when I told them, of course. My mother just laughed at me. I was mad at myself for a while but then, oh well.

This post was supposed to be about my almost-happened interview with Pixie Lott, but since it didn’t happen, here’s my reflection on the whole situation.

Thinking back now, firstly, I’m beginning to realize it’s not that big of a deal. #YOLO. Just kidding. That hashtag is overused. But seriously though, take that in for a moment-You Only Live Once. If I only live once, I wanna make mistakes, especially while I’m still young. I’m only human. There’s no point dwelling on the past and getting angry all over again. It’s a waste of precious time. Secondly, while I do need to forgive myself and move on, I also need to learn from my mistakes. Me missing the interview chance was totally my fault. I cannot blame anyone else for it since it was just the result of me being an idiot. Blogging and tackling school work all at once is turning out to be harder than I thought, and I do struggle. However, since I made the conscious choice to continue on with my blogging career, I need to start being more responsible for it. I need to improve my time management, primarily.

I also need to focus on the essence of my blogging. I always told myself that I didn’t want to be the type of fashion blogger that just posts photos of Chanel and Givenchy, accepting unhealthy fashion ideals and passing selling them on to the public as if those standards are the ultimate rules of fashion, conforming to trends without critical thinking. However, these days I often find myself thirsty for opportunities with famous, popular people that might give me my ‘big break’. It’s ridiculous, I know. I need to focus on my writing; my posts, which express my true colours and insights, and stop floating above my conscience, swimming on the edge of glamour and undeserved fame. This is my confession and promise to you guys that from now on I’ll remind myself each day of why I’m staying up this late(or NOT staying up, in the case of how my Pixie Lott interview went down, haha) and take myself to the beginning whenever I feel like I’m becoming too obsessed with the shallow glittery stuff. Because I believe I can make a positive change and contribute to the development of self-expression.

I love you guys. Thank you.

Interview with Lenox Tillman from America’s Next Top Model!

Hey readers,

I’ve picked up a new habit of doing, not saying. As the Tyra Banks(a major role model of mine) once said, “Don’t make excuses, make improvements.” Which is why, as I was watching America’s Next Top Model(ANTM) last week, I thought, “What’s stopping me from getting closer to pursuing my lifelong dream in fashion?” All the contestants on ANTM seemed to be making their way through rubble to achieve their dreams(heck, they walk down buildings and pose mid-air and walk practically naked down a runway full of strangers just to prove they’ve got what it takes). ANTM is a perfect embodiment of the bittersweet glory of reaching out toward a dream in fashion. The ANTM theme tune goes, ‘Wanna be on top?’ And this time I immediately think, “Hell yeah?!” And what did I do next? Reach out to ANTM, of course.

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(Tyra Banks and Lenox Tillman)

So here I am, a week later, with an interview with the smart, talented, and beautiful 19 year old Lenox Tillman from ANTM Cycle 21(the current cycle that’s currently airing). She’s one of the most talented contestants on the show right now, and it’s unbelievable that she started out as just a sweet, quiet small-town girl. Now she’s just rockin’ the whole competition with her amazing photos. We talked about what it’s like to be on ANTM(obviously!), working with Tyra Banks(gosh I can’t even), modelling in front of the judges, hardships, and some personal stuff.

You can watch Lenox and the other remaining ANTM contestants on the CW. Wonder who will win…(http://www.cwtv.com/shows/americas-next-top-model/)

Now without further ado, here’s my exclusive interview with Lenox! Enjoy! : )

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Keep up with Lenox! (FACEBOOK/INSTAGRAM/TWITTER)

1. Tell us a bit about your childhood. What were you like at school?

I was a pretty shy but active kid. I played softball all of my childhood and was almost always outside if I wasn’t sleeping. In school, I would tend to be the quiet and weird kid to everyone and I definitely wasn’t the most confident. I usually was just drawing and kept close to my small group of close friends.

Haha, I can definitely relate to this.

2. What/who inspired you to run for ANTM at first? 

I always said I would try out for the show once I was 18 because I was such a huge fan of it, but once I actually turned 18 I felt like it was unrealistic to think I could get on! It was actually my mom who saw an ad for a casting call and talked me into going and trying. So I guess my mom was the one who inspired me!

3. Have you watched the episodes released so far? The other contestants talked on screen about how they thought that your ultimate weakness was your lack of self-confidence. How do you feel about that?

Yes, I have seen all of the episodes. I love watching it just like I did with all of the other cycles but me being on it now makes it even cooler, I have to admit. Haha! As for the lack of self-confidence comments, I wasn’t surprised by that when I heard them. I think they’re right, and while I think I’ve come a long way with being okay in who I am, I still am super tough on myself. This competition definitely brought that out in me, too.

You’re only two years older than me but you’re so much wiser! 

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4. What was trying to model when you had to act “sexy” like?

It was awkward since I had a giant crowd of people watching, but I did my best and tried to laugh at myself throughout it since I wanted to be a good sport. I’m working on it!

5. What’s going through your mind when you’re modeling in front of the camera? Is it nerve-racking or does it make you more confident? Have you gotten used to it?

When I first started modeling I was absolutely terrified during shoots because everything was so foreign to me. I have gotten so much better since then, though. I now tend to just be constantly brainstorming from the moment I walk on set to the moment I walk off. I am much more comfortable with it and just try my best to see it as an art experiment that photographer, makeup artist, stylist, and I are doing together.

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6. What’s the hardest thing you’ve ever done?

Eat an onion.

7. Who’s your ultimate role model?

In my modeling career? Lindsey Wixson. In overall life? I have so many; I would say Jill Bolte Taylor, Stevie Nicks, and Florence Welch if I had to narrow it down.

8. Tell us something no one (referring to the general public) knows about you.

Hmmmm, I can lick my elbow! It is said to be impossible but I can do it!

Cool!

 

9. What are your plans for the future?

I plan on growing up and working hard at whatever I am doing, mostly. Hopefully, I can continue modeling and enjoy all of its adventures for as long as I can. One day I hope to own my own avian rehabilitation center or sanctuary, too. That would be amazing.

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(Lenox with Cory from Cycle 20!)

10. If, in the future, your child wanted to become a model and follow in your footsteps, would you tell her/him to go for it?

I want my kids to do whatever makes them happy. If modeling is what makes them happy then I will gladly encourage and support them.

That was such a flawless response, haha.

11. Are you a feminist?

Yeah, duh. Equality between men and women is awesome. Men are cool and women are cool, that is obvious.

12. What’s it like to stand in front of the ANTM judges at panel? What was is like to work with Tyra Banks?

It is terrifying! All of your hard work from that week is about to pay off or be thrown in your face and there’s absolutely nothing you can do about it. As for Tyra, she is a great business woman and I really enjoyed getting to see that behind the scenes. I hope I can learn to juggle that well- haha!

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Lenox is just amazing. Inside and out.

I’ll be back soon with more : )

Here’s a huge thank you to ANTM’s publicity manager Ellen who helped me reach out to Lenox, and of course thank you to Lenox herself for giving such thoughtful answers(and being awesome).

The friend that looks amazing in her soccer uniform and sneakers

Hey readers,

The time has finally come for me to show you guys the photos I’ve been taking with the new camera that my friend Jen lent me.

I took loads of photos of my friend Jiyeon. She has a unique look, an interesting sense of style, and an easygoing attitude, so she makes the perfect model to work with. The sunlight was just perfect when we were taking these photos.

So this is what we managed to create after about two hours of light bickering and fooling around with the camera(which was a Canon DSLR, by the way).

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The one above is my personal favorite. It was hard to get the right angle though.

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“Why are they always telling me to sit?”

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I love photos of natural, honest moments, like the one above.

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Thanks : ) Don’t forget to leave a comment!

Why I cried watching the Chanel fashion show

Hey readers,

Being involved in fashion often brings me back to feminism, which leads me to fashion again, which takes me to feminism. Especially in today’s social scene, at this point, I think fashion and feminism are two things that cannot be conceptually or historically detached from one another. Which is why Chanel’s Ready-To-Wear Spring/Summer Paris 2015 show is attracting speculation and sparking controversy directed toward the center of the fashion industry, obviously, themselves. (The) Karl Lagerfeld, who designs the iconic Chanel pieces (and who is quite the fashion icon himself), staged an interesting feminism protest march in this season’s show. Watch it below:

The show was held in the Grand Palais, which Karl transformed into “Boulevard Chanel”, to set the show in a background resembling a European-style traditional sort of street. The clothes-I couldn’t find anything special about the clothes themselves, they were exactly, stereotypically what one would expect from a typical Chanel collection (except maybe more tweed). How the clothes changed throughout the show, however, is definitely something to take note of while watching the show, in regard of the message at the end of the show. What’s interesting though is that I’ve read plenty of reviews on the show(hello Refinery29 and Jezebel, both of which clearly weren’t buying the whole faux-protest theme, and The Cut, which seemed pretty neutral, and Fashionista and StyleList Canada, both of which praised Karl’s feminism festivity, and The Closet Feminist, which didn’t seem to keen on the idea but raised some interesting questions), and all of these reviews mainly hover on the slogans(which is understandable since I must admit some of them were TACKY) but none of them even mention or elaborate in detail on how the clothes developed and changed as the show went on. It’s funny because I actually thought the transformation of the Chanel pieces as the show progressed was one of the key factors to fully understanding the show itself and the story that Karl was trying to tell through this season’s show. At the beginning of the show, the models(all of which are women, except for one) are dressed in colorful tweed(SO, SO MUCH TWEED) and radiant ensembles of flowery, dotty patterns, reminding viewers of the 60s/70s.

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(Georgia May Jagger)

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(Saskia De Brauw)

This changes, however, when at around 4:06, the music becomes more uptight and so do the models’ walking formation and the clothes. The flowery long boots and fluffy clothes are nowhere to be seen, and lines of models looking more fierce and modernized with boxy shorts and blouses and shiny, chunky gold belts start parading down the city-themed runway, and instantly I’m feeling like I just stepped into a new era of women’s fashion and am witnessing the evolution of women’s style. And then at 9:18, this jumpy crowd of women wearing the colorful fashions of the first half of the show are literally jumping down the runway, overwhelming me with all these hand-written slogan signs, many of them representing feminism. The feminist slogans helped me to reach the understanding that the contrasting 60s/70s –> modern clothing style transition in the show was a part of expressing feminism throughout the ages. It was a pleasant twist to the whole show.

Women’s clothes have defined and shaped feminism, and I’m guessing that that’s what Karl was trying to portray through the transition in clothes (and obviously through the slightly tacky slogans, too). While I do agree with Refinery29 to some extent that the slogans were pretty ironically insignificant and, again, tacky, I still think the whole feminist movement reenactment was meaningful, in both the name of fashion AND feminism. Chanel is receiving A LOT of criticism from people saying that the whole feminism thing was shallow and thoughtless, merely a trend, but I on the other hand loved it! Feminism is a concept that still needs to be embraced by many more around the world and the fact that a global, central, influential fashion brand like Chanel is marking the recent revival of feminist spirit just goes to show that fashion is still doing what it’s excelled at all this time-bringing us back to feminism.

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I teared up watching the ending of the show. I don’t think the slogans have to be oh-so-philosophically-deep or sophisticated. After all, it’s a display of suppressed feminist emotions and years and years of unfairness set in the 60s/70s of second-wave feminism. (I interpreted it as a reenactment, since the clothes the “activists” were wearing were those from the earlier parts of the show, and-as I explained above-I viewed the whole show as a sort of timeline for women and feminism and fashion.) In that sense Karl and Chanel succeeded in expressing what feminism feels like and what it meant for those women standing up front at those brave protests in the past. I don’t think it was shallow or materialistic at all; it was a powerful, iconic reminder of how we’re where we are at the moment, and of the decades-centuries of injustice and pain that so many women had to face. It was more than just a “runway stunt”, as many online fashion magazines are describing it. It was Karl Lagerfeld putting the final seal on the recent feminism issues all over SNS through a historically meaningful expressive medium-fashion. It was this controversial, exciting blend of feminism and fashion that inspired a certain strength and pride in being a woman that brought me to tears. (And not even the Titanic made me cry, so this probably means something. : )

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Also, since I’m openly rooting for this show, I can’t help but rebut respond to some quotes from other sites…

“You don’t need to be a CNN buff to get it: Between the unrest in the Middle East, police violence in Ferguson, this week’s uprisings in Hong Kong, and New York’s recent, massive march for climate change, there are plenty of issues worth protesting. But, when Karl Lagerfeld staged a “feminist protest” earlier today for Chanel’s Paris runway show, it felt, well, a bit twisted.” 

-Refinery29

I don’t know what Refinery29 is getting at here. Why on earth would the selection of feminism as a theme make you feel “twisted”? Sure, there are definitely a lot of other serious issues going on on our planet, and I think feminism is always and has always been one of them, online AND offline. Is feminism an issue NOT “worth protesting” anymore?

“…waving signs emblazoned with rather tepid political slogans like “Free Freedom” (whatever that means)…”

-Refinery29

I think “Free Freedom” means that feminism is a type of freedom that has been locked up for so long and still hasn’t been fully freed, so Karl is making an ironic pun. Freedom is supposed to be free and natural, but feminism has not been in many places for such a long time.

“…this season presents protest as pure product, the irony of which we suspect Karl is both aware, and presides over with a provocative, Warholian glee.”

-Refinery29

I disagree, Refinery29. You’re looking at the issue while holding an irrational grudge. What part of the closing act gives off the notion of “protest as pure product”…? (Well obviously except the fact that it’s a fashion show, although even that’s not that much of a rational conclusion to jump to either.) Of course we all know that Chanel is a company, which means it’s seeking to earn profit from selling clothes. But that doesn’t make it negative! If anything, Chanel should be praised for doing/representing something meaningful in the process. Fashion is one of the most effective ways to spread a message, and THAT’S what Karl knows.

“The messages are all very confused, and confusing, which gives the impression that Lagerfeld’s notion towards woman empowerment was merely gestural, or that he was responding to what he perceives as a trend, something that was written about while he was designing this.”

-Jezebel

Like I stated waaay above in this post, I don’t think feminist slogans should have to include some sort of deep metaphor or whatever for it to be meaningful. People experience feminism and sexual injustice in many different forms and therefore it is expressed in many different methods of literary expression. Also, just a thought, but wouldn’t it seem more “gestural” or “trend”-like for Karl to implement totally cliché terms used in describing feminist emotions? Just sayin’.

“Also: why is his feminist vision SO F**KING WHITE?!”

-Jezebel

Urrrmmm… I honestly do not know how to perfectly respond to this because there are just so many things that are wrong about this statement. All I can say at this point is, well, I’m pretty, very, really sure Karl didn’t deliberately place mostly Caucasian models on the runway to send the message that feminism is for a certain race…? I mean…I’m sure the people at Chanel weren’t like, “We need more ‘white’ models here! We need a higher ‘white’ ratio!”, right…? If they were, then that changes everything, but I’m pretty sure that wasn’t how it went…

Comment or Like this post by clicking the title of this post, then scrolling down. The Like button and Comment box are both at the bottom of the post. I love reading you guys’ feedback, whether it’s positive or negative, so don’t hesitate to leave an honest comment! : )

Image Credits:

http://fashionolic.blogspot.kr/2014/10/chanel-spring-2015-paris-fashion-week.html

http://www.ebuzznew.com/models-take-chanels-paris-protests-beyond-the-runway

http://www.fashionblender.com.au/

Interview with editor of Kimi Magazine, Ciara Rose

Hey readers : )

Today I’m proud to introduce the lovely Ciara, who runs Kimi Magazine. Besides being one of the best magazines in the world, Kimi Magazine is a magazine that’s different from your average magazine- all its profit goes to an organization called ‘Eating Disorders Victoria’ in Australia. Kimi promotes new talent(artists, models, musicians etc), a healthy lifestyle, and healthy standards. Ciara has done incredible work for Kimi Magazine, and has helped and inspired people to love themselves for their own individuality. She’s my newest role model and I can guarantee that you guys will also look up to her after reading this interview. So bring your friend, sister, brother, parents, or whoever else you think needs some inspiration and warmth right now, and without further ado, let’s begin!

(Kimi Magazine’s website:http://www.kimimagazine.com/)

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(image above: the cover of the premiere issue(issue #1) of Kimi Magazine.)

(K:Konni, C:Ciara)

K: Hi Ciara! First of all, introduce us to Kimi Magazine!

C: Hello Konni, lovely to meet you!
Kimi Magazine is a fashion, culture, music and art magazine that aims to evoke positivity and warmth in its readers. All our pages are colourful and bright, all our stories are optimistic yet realistic, and intend to lift your mood. And most importantly, all our models are healthy in mind and body. We sell copies for $15 each, and 100% of the proceeds earned are injected into the budget of the amazing team at Eating Disorders Victoria. Every donation counts!

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K: Why did you start Kimi Magazine? What got you inspired to make Kimi?

C: I had the idea for a couple of years before I began the project, because it was only last year when I first realized that I’d saved enough funds to get it started! One of my closest friends has been in and out of psychiatric wards suffering from an eating disorder since we were 9. The wards have white walls with little colour, and to my horror, most of the girls were reading mainstream fashion magazines and watching Next Top Model! I understand that many people like these shows/zines, but they aren’t going to help these sick patients recover. So I went to buy my best friend a fashion magazine that used realistic, non-photoshopped models and had stories that didn’t mention ‘calories’ or ‘bikini bodies’ … and noticed that there were none. Why? I thought. Why can’t there be a fashion magazine using a range of models? Why can’t there be a fashion magazine with only minimal and necessary editing? Why can’t there be a fashion magazine that has recipes that aren’t focused on weight loss? Why can’t there be a fashion magazine that you can read, start to finish, without feeling like you’re not good enough? Something had to be done… and from that day onward, I had decided that no matter how much effort, cost, tears or stress it would require, I would do it myself.

(K: I truly admire your passion and great heart. You’re a wonderful role model to this generation. Faith in humanity restored!)

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(Model: Stefania Ferrario. Photographer: Georgia Wiggs. Make-up: Pip Davies. Stylist: April Montgomery. Kimi Magazine.

LEFT-before image retouching, RIGHT-after image retouching. This photo shows how minimal Kimi’s photoshop retouching is. Unlike a lot of other magazines that rely on airbrush and photoshop to create inhumanly-perfect images of skinny girls without a single blemish on their skin, Kimi Magazine does not alter the model’s physical features at all. They simply make the image brighter and clearer, so that it’s suitable to be published.)

K: What are your prospects for the future of Kimi?

C: I believe the media has a hugely harmful impact on young girls (and increasingly, boys!), jeopardising their wellbeing. This extract, from the EDV(Eating Disorders Victoria) website, is rather alarming:

“In 1998, 38 months after television first came to Nadroga in Fiji, 15% of girls [aged 17 on the average] admitted to vomiting to control weight. 74% of girls reported feeling “too big and fat” at least sometimes. Fiji has only one TV channel, which broadcasts mostly American, Australian, and British programs.”

This, and masses of other evidence, is irrefutable – our media is greatly influencing our ideas of beauty in a negative manner, and it is about time somebody took a stand. Cue Kimi – a project that I’ve been hoping can act as a light at the end of the dark tunnel we’ve been trapped in for so long. I want Kimi to grow in sales, not only for the charity’s sake, but so our message can reach a wider audience. Owning a piece of untainted media could have a huge impact with some expansion… Hopefully, this will give us more of a shot at opposing the intentionally confidence-crushing magazines that have flooded our mainstream media.

(K: Again, I’m touched… I hope you achieve all of that, so that more people can break free from the negative influence of the media.)

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(from a Kimi Magazine editorial with models from “Plus size” agency BELLA Models. Photographer: Dennys Ilic. Models: Claryssa and Belle at BELLA. Hair and makeup: Kat Desouza. Stylist: Brittany Hendriks. Post: ISKA.)
K: Now tell us about YOU, Ciara! How old are you, what are you studying/what did you study, where did you grow up..?

C: I am 21 years old, from Melbourne in Australia (it’s true – the weather is crazy, four seasons in one day!). I am currently studying my third year of a Bachelor of Youth Work at Victoria University.
Whilst I was fortunate enough to grow up in the middle class and attend a private school, I never associated with the materialistic attitudes adopted by many of the people around me. Though I was in a wealthy household, my dad in particular ensured that my sister and I earned our own money from a very young age. I started waitressing at his restaurant when I was 13, and am very grateful for the work ethic that has been ingrained in me. My mum has also been very influential – she is currently nursing for an Indigenous community, which involves leaving the city to live in isolation for weeks at a time. Her generosity and selflessness has undoubtedly had a very formative impact on me.

K: What’s the most important thing to keep in mind when picking an outfit to wear?

C: “Does the outfit reflect YOU?” – definitely the most important thing to keep in mind! Wearing an outfit that is not “you” is, in my opinion, very easy to see, as the person in question will not look 100% comfortable. Whilst I hire stylists for my photoshoots, I will ensure that they choose clothing that reflects who the model is, and NEVER have them dressed in anything outside of their comfort zone… Hence the importance of meeting all my models before hiring them. I can get a vibe for who they are and take note of their individual style. But most importantly, it helps me guarantee that they’re a lovely human being who I will be proud to feature in this project. These are the models that really glow in any outfit, and this is illustrated in the editorials!

K: Why is fashion important?

C: Fashion is, or should be, who we are inside expressed outwardly… allowing us to embrace what makes us unique, to show the world a little something about ourselves. My best friend and I have similar style – we love clashes in textures and layers… we love beads and sequins… we love daggy, patterned jumpers that are three sizes too big… we love secondhand and pre-loved pieces… we love jewelry (that we generally make for each other!).

We are both very imaginative and creative people, who feel nostalgia for our childhood days of stick-on earrings, friendship bracelets and overalls… When fairy dresses weren’t a “costume”, but a perfectly acceptable item of clothing we could (and would!) wear five times a week.

 

(preview of desginer Dorothy & Evelyn. Photographer: Alex McKay. Model: Em at Maverick. Makeup: Jacki Botans. Kimi Magazine.)

K: What do you think teenage girls these days need the most? What piece of advice do you have for us?

C: Teenagers are under so much stress on a daily basis. Parents, teachers, fellow peers and the media are just some of the many sources of pressure and standards. They dictate how we’re meant to look, what we’re meant to desire, who we’re meant to be… It can really take away our sense of individuality.
My suggested solution is embodied in my life motto: “Whatever floats your boat, without sinking someone else’s.” What I mean by that is, do whatever makes you happy, so long as it doesn’t require the sacrifice of somebody else’s wellbeing. Look how you want, dress how you’d like, act as you please – if it makes you happy and doesn’t create unhappiness for anyone else, then there’s no harm done! Follow the beat of your own drum! And anyone who criticises you for something that doesn’t impact them or anyone else in a negative manner is NOT the kind of person you need in your life. It sounds simple and yes, easier said than done, but it’s really the most personal advice I have. It’s worked for me! I’m the happiest I’ve ever been since I’ve started staying true to this motto 🙂

K: You featured some musicians in Kimi… I’m just curious, what kind of music are you into?

C: Whilst growing up, my mum and dad were kind enough to introduce me to a range of music that I still love to this day! My favourites would have to be Bjork and Jeff Buckley, probably because I not only fell in love with their music, but also deeply respect who they are and what they stand for. I also adore David Sylvian, who I think is one of the most underrated musicians of all time!

K: What did you want to be when you were a little girl?

C: My first career choice was a forensic pathologist! That seems quite gory for a little girl, but I was always very curious and loved a good mystery. My sister and I read the Goosebumps books, watched Scooby Doo, and were obsessed with our favourite boardgame – Cluedo! (I was always Miss Scarlett and she was always Miss Peacock, or the game would not begin.)

(K: Haha : ) I remember being too scared to read the Goosebumps series…)

K: What do you think of Konni Kim Designs?

C: Konni, I think you are wonderful. Especially taking interest in a project on the other side of the globe, and going out of your way to help us spread the word. I have been eager to talk more about Kimi on a larger scale, and you are the first platform I have been offered. So a thousand times, thank you! 🙂

(K: That’s so sweet, Ciara! Thank you so much. You really inspire me and I think you’re a wonderful person. I hope to be a great woman like you someday!)

K: Are you fashionable?

C: Fashion is in the eye of the beholder, so I have no idea how to answer this! To those who like eccentric, eclectic fashion then yes, I suppose so. But my style wouldn’t be ideal for those who opt for the chic and sleek, like my sister (studying her Masters of Architecture) – she gravitates towards structured clothing in shades of mainly blacks or greys, and looks really elegant and classy in everything she wears. My style would not suit her, just as her style would not suit me, as our outfits reflect who we are (polar opposites!). It’s all a question of preference.

(K: I completely agree.)

K: What’s your average day like? Are you very organized and busy, or do you tend to lounge around and get inspiration from random things?

C: I am very busy all the time, and I couldn’t have it any other way! Last year I decided to join my certificate and diploma degree together to save myself a year of study; this meant I was at university Tuesday nights, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Friday mornings and every 3rd Saturday – on top of that, I had to fit in 250 volunteer hours to complete my course. Fridays and Saturdays when most people are going out, I would be working til early morning, as that’s the only hours I could fit in a job… And the little spare time that remained after that hectic schedule, I spent on the Kimi project! But this lifestyle is my choice – I love positively contributing to society. The rare day when I don’t do anything productive, I really don’t feel like myself!

(Photographer: Georgia Wiggs. Food stylist: Christabell McDonald. Model: Oats the Rabbit! Kimi Magazine.

The rabbit is adorable!! The food is making me hungry…)

K: Are you an artist?

C: I am a musician, if that counts! I used to study the Bachelor of Music at Victorian College of the Arts, and also started a diploma of jazz piano at Ballarat University. Whilst I love and miss studying music, I am much happier continuing it as a hobby, as pursuing youth work is my true calling.

(preview of featured artist Brian Cheung on Kimi Magazine.)

K: What is one item in your wardrobe that you just NEED to have and can’t ever throw away?

C: Since I am a sentimental person, it would have to be the sparkly blue scarf that my best friend knitted me for my 21st birthday whilst she was in hospital… I used it for a feature in issue one, you can spot the musician Asami wearing the beautiful scarf in some of the shots!

K: What were you like when you were seventeen?

C: At 17, I was very scattered in terms of my goals and dreams. I knew I wanted to end up in a career that would be humanitarian, but had NO idea what to specialize in! Whilst I had known Amelia since birth (our mothers were friends before we were born), she moved away to Albury, and it wasn’t til 4 years ago that we became close again. It was during this time, witnessing her struggles and her strength firsthand, that I decided I wanted to contribute to the field of Eating Disorders. Visiting various wards on a daily or weekly basis opened my eyes to a myriad of deficiencies in the system; these realizations crystallized into certainty of what wrongs I wanted to right in this world. She is constantly my inspiration, whether we’re seeing each other every day or whether we haven’t caught up in months. Her brave endeavors are the reason I’ve evolved from a confused 17 year old into a confident and passionate adult.

(K: I’m so happy for you! Please keep up the awesomeness so that people like me can continue to learn from you and be inspired.)

K: Who is your girl crush/idol?

C: I absolutely love Robyn Lawley, an Australian “plus size” model. As well as being breathtakingly beautiful and a dedicated health advocate, she is very intelligent and politically educated. You can see pictures of gorgeous Robyn in an article for issue one!

Aaand that’s a wrap, guys! : D

I hope you enjoyed this interview-I DEFINITELY did. Ciara is such a talented young woman, and I was head over heels in joy when she agreed to do the interview for my blog. It was such a pleasure to talk to her and learn more about Kimi Magazine and about her life and philosophy. So here’s a massive THANK YOU! to Ciara for sharing her insights and thoughts and providing us with such thoughtful answers.

My dream used to be to ‘be the editor of a glamorous fashion magazine’. Ciara inspired me to change that dream to: ‘be the editor of a fashion magazine that can actually support people of all sizes, both genders, and of any racial background, promote healthy standards and mindsets, and inspire people to just love themselves!’ 

Don’t forget to check out Kimi Magazine’s website and Facebook page:

http://www.kimimagazine.com/

https://www.facebook.com/kimi.mag

And get your hands on a copy of Kimi Magazine if you can! : )

If you liked this post, don’t forget to like, comment, and follow! To like or comment on this post, just click the title of this post, then scroll down, and you’ll see the Like button and Comment box.

See you again next time!

-Konni

My sister: Aspiring Model! (Fashion Blast #4)

Hey readers!

My sister and I are usually constantly arguing with each other, whether it’s about my sister taking my clothes without my permission or me using her phone to google ‘Tyler Blackburn’ and drool over how hot he is surf the internet without wifi(oops?!). But one thing that always brings us back together and makes us both happy is her modelling for my blog, especially since one of her life goals is to become a model. I love taking photos, and she loves being in them.

Today I’m going to show you guys some photos of my sis that I took over the past few days. She can be super annoying sometimes, but I must admit I have to respect her sense of style.

Look #1. In these photos, she’s wearing a plain white y-shirt, a navy-colored tie, grey skirt-leggings, bright blue socks, and to complete the otherwise boring look, she put on a yellow padded sleeveless jacket. I love how the yellow jacket and blue socks make the outfit look quirky.

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Green Converses make anything look better : D

 

Look #2. This outfit is easy to put together, but makes a statement when worn. My sister is wearing a black t-shirt, a brown leather jacket with a grey hood thing(?) attached on the inside, black skinny jeans, and navy-colored canvas shoes.

 

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The thing I love about this leather jacket is the zipper! It’s not in the middle but on the left side, which makes the outfit more fun.

 

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Look #3. CAPS. I don’t really wear hats because I don’t like the way they fit awkwardly on my head(maybe it’s because of how my head is shaped?), but my sister loves them and in my opinion they look good on her. She loves hip-hop styled hats with flat fronts(the ones you can find in the brand, New Era Caps).

 

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Colorful flowery hats were a hit in Korea this season.

 

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I hope you enjoyed this post! Don’t forget to comment, like, and follow this blog- to comment or like, just click on the title of this post, then scroll down. You’ll see the Like button and Comment box and the end of the post.

If you want to read more posts like this/thought this post was horrendous, be sure to drop a comment on this post and tell me : D

 

New York Fashion Week, and everything in between.

Hi readers! : D (I remember about a year ago, when I didn’t have any readers to say hi to at the beginning of my posts.. Thank You to all of you that have made it here with me.)

If you Google “Fashion”, you’ll probably get a whole stream of news articles talking about New York Fashion Week, which is currently the biggest ongoing event in the fashion world right now. It runs from Feb. 6th~Feb.13th in a place called Lincoln Center in NYC. (Click here to watch live streaming of NYFW.)

I actually did Google “Fashion” about five minutes ago and did find myself browsing through a long list of fashion-related articles telling me all about NYFW and which designers were showing tonight, etc etc. While reading the articles, I thought “Why not do my own article/post about NYFW but make it more interesting and Konni-Kim-Designs-ish?” So that’s exactly what I’m gonna do. I thought that since all of you can easily find professional, informative articles and gossip about what the hottest designs are in NYFW, and who attended, and what they were wearing to the event etc, I should tell you guys about what I read in between the lines of those fashion articles. How I see it as a 17 year old high school student wanting to be a part of the fashion buzz.

Here we go.

#1. First off, MODELS.

When you watch videos of the shows in Fashion Week, you can’t help but notice how gorgeous and stern and god-like the models look. They all have spotless, clear faces and stick-skinny limbs and every single one of them is incredibly tall. Why? I kept thinking, “Why?” Why are these the standards for being a fashion model?

Today I asked my best friend if she would model for Konni Kim Designs, because I wanted to do a post about Korean high school students’ fashion. She refused, saying something along the lines of “Find someone else. I don’t think my body is fit to be a model. The clothes won’t look pretty on me.” So I said “But my blog is about real fashion. Actual style in real life. It doesn’t have to be pretty. Anyone could be a model for my blog. Seriously, anyone. You don’t have to be slim or look like Barbara Palvin.” It was a meaningful conversation. At least, to me it was.

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(image above: famous model Kate Moss)

The reality of the situation is that society does consider a slender, tall figure as “model-like”. Some people say that it’s the body type that accentuates the clothes the best, and that’s why models should be that way, but I disagree. Real fashion isn’t about making the clothes look as pretty as possible, it’s about expressing something. The feeling of looking at a short, plump person wearing a dress is obviously different to the feeling of seeing a tall, skinny person wearing it-but who says the latter is better? The shorter, plumper person can make a certain statement that the taller person would never be able to make. I’d like to clarify that I’m not against tall, slim models. I’m against the social norm that models must be tall and slim. There shouldn’t be a must for models.

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(image above: shirtless Abercrombie&Fitch models in Paris.)

#2. Performances

Since #1 almost turned into a rant, here’s a bit of sunshine from me. I absolutely love the performances in fashion shows. It’s a great way to mix styles and enhance the designer’s message/expression to the public. Sometimes just having models walk around in heels isn’t enough to express what the new collection is all about. Performances show that fashion isn’t just about making nice clothes. In a way, it’s everything. It’s the feeling you get when you see a new dress. It can be the shock you experience when you see Marilyn Manson for the first time. It can be the soft coziness of your favorite fluffy sweater. Performances help you feel those things at a fashion show.

Victoria’s Secret is a lingerie&sleepwear fashion brand that’s famous for its creative shows with great performances. Performances from the hottest stars make their lingerie seem more fun and dynamic, rather than serious and dull.

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(image above: Taylor Swift performing ‘I Knew You Were Trouble’ at a Victoria’s Secret show.)

#3. Fashion X Art

Another thing I love about fashion shows these days is how I can see that art is seeping into fashion. When I interviewed Vinita Mohan, a fellow fashion blogger, she inspired me by saying that “fashion is art that you wear” and I really agree with her. (Check out the interview here.)

The prestigious high-fashion brand Prada has recently become known for doing this. For example, six artists(Mesa from Spain, El Mac from the United States, Gabriel Specter from Canada, Stinkfish from Colombia, and Jeanne Detallante and Pierre Mornet from France) created murals of women’s faces for the backdrop of a show and for the ready-to-wear pieces.

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(image above: Prada’s Spring/Summer 2014 campaign, with the murals of women’s faces by six different artists)

#4. Exclusiveness (brace yourselves for another rant)

I really dislike how fashion shows have their “seating hierarchy”. Another thing I dislike even more is the exclusiveness of the fashion show itself, especially in Fashion Week. It’s not like a sports game, where anyone can just buy themselves a ticket. Most of the time you have to be specially invited, and only people related to the fashion industry or people who can benefit the brands are invited. For someone who strongly believes in real life fashion that can be applied to the general public, I don’t understand why we can’t all go and see the most prestigious designers’ latest designs. It’s a really big flaw of the fashion world-that it’s so tightly knit together so that “normal people” feel intimidated and excluded. Fashion should stop pretending to be something it isn’t. Come on Fashion, we all know that you’re just like the rest of us.

Thanks for reading : D

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Image Credits/References:

www.mtv.com.au, modxchange.wordpress.com, bemagazine.me

http://www.blouinartinfo.com/news/story/998165/10-best-fashion-and-art-mashups-of-2013