Hopeful.

Hopeful.

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She was hopeful; hopeful that she might someday be different. Maybe this wasn’t all. There’s probably more to life than grey slabs and repetition. Maybe one day she’d find that she could be more than her past. But then again, maybe not.

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I don’t know how to take photos but I tried.

Enjoy my photos with the lyrics of Thomston‘s songs. (Look him up on Soundcloud I swear he’s amazing.)
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Stepping right in to find out we were blind

Our vision was drowned by a burning sky

Caught in the daze you wore it so well

The hotter it got the less that I felt

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You’re holding it in, you say you’re okay

And I believe you

Feeling like we’re at the equator, I see you

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Dysfunctional in every way,

we drive all night and sleep all day,

Caught up in the conflict,

puts me on edge but I like the feeling

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I’m coming up don’t worry now

I’m too young to worry ’bout

Burning out

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But I need you

It’s hard to make you not forget that we need you

After all this time, I’m starting to see you

Convince me that you’re fine

Please

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Am I a pain in your side?

Puts me on edge but I like the feeling,

Cause you’re the pain in mine,

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I can see your collarbones and baby I’m scared

Never thought I’d be so unprepared.

All of the photos were taken by myself. I tried to capture moments that stood out to me or gave me certain emotions.

And trust me- listen to Thomston!

#: photography, moments, beauty, fashion, Thomston.

The images above are property of Konni Kim.

What we think ‘being an artist’ means

Hey readers,

When I hear the word ‘artist’, I imagine a free spirit; I visualize long, straggly hair, a pair of shades nonchalantly placed slightly tilted above the nose, a cigarette(or even better, cigar) between the quivering, chapped lips, with a paint-splattered ripped white shirt(or no shirt), and ripped faded old jeans, and to finish off, probably a pair of black Doc Martens(or at least something that looks like Doc Martens).

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(And it would probably look somewhat similar to this.)

I’ve realized that this is my way of absorbing what ‘being an artist’ means from popular culture: movies, novels, television, and online. The idea of being an artist seems more romantic now than it ever has before. Take the recent box office hit Begin Again, for example. The protagonists are drunk, broke, considered unimportant by mainstream society, yet somehow manage to overlook these realistic obstacles and strive toward an artistic, emotional, sentimental value, which portrays them them as true artists. (“Maybe music should be FREE,” Mark Ruffalo says to his music industry business partner/boss in Begin Again.)

Judging from how a huge portion of society defines ‘being an artist’, it seems sooo, so different from being a banker or a stock investor or a teacher. It seems like a job that’s so aloof from the majority of other jobs out there. Maybe it’s because most artists aren’t in it for the money or the profit or even popularity, but rather for the meanings of things. They often hold a contrasting perspective on life itself, and know(or at least act like they know) to appreciate even the subtle things, from emotions or moments to the feeling you get when you step outside on a rainy day to the randomness of the birthmark on the back of your left ankle(see? that sounds artistic, haha). We expect artists to not be money-driven, because we think that art is supposed to be pure and crazy and unrealistic. It’s almost magical in itself. In fact, I bet being an artist is way more romantic than Tinder(obviously).

Now, my humble, personal opinion is that I disagree with how being an artist is branded because it creates some unfair stereotypes for artists. And although I’m constantly tempted to lock myself in my room with my paintbrushes and 4B pencils and respond to my mother’s “Keonha you gotta study!” with “Mum. I’m an artist. Artists don’t fret over such profane matters. I need time to drink my black coffee and think my artistic thoughts(and no, I’m not daydreaming. Artists don’t daydream. We do creative thinking).”, I try to dismiss the thoughts by reminding myself of the essence of art(which I believe to be genuineness) and scold myself for falling into the somewhat shallow trap of the commercially painted ‘popular’ image of ‘the artist’.

But then again, at the end of the day, none of us really have/will ever have a complete answer to the mysterious, fabulous question of what being an artist means to us as humans. All we can do is write blog posts like this and express what goes on in our heads and try to scrape at the surface of the great holy truths of art. After writing this post, I STILL don’t have a straightforward answer to what being an artist actually means, but one thing I do know is that what I love most about being an artist(alright, alright-self proclaimed artist) is the freedom. You’re socially allowed to be totally nuts and display your true weird self for everyone to see. This is great news for me and all the other slightly crazy different humans out there, since we’re usually in love with spontaneity and sudden outbursts of randomness. Isn’t that how life’s supposed to be lived-free, natural, and fun? : )

Image Credits: http://favim.com/image/179077/

A girl that used to be rich but lost everything and became a gypsy wanderer

Hey readers,

Just using my imagination…

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It’s been quite a while since I last did a personal art post, so here’s a new one!

I tried to make her look as lost, determined, special, beautiful, mature, and naive as possible. ♥

To comment or like this post, just click on the title of this post, then scroll down. You’ll see the Like button and Comment box at the bottom of the post. I love reading your comments, so go ahead and tell me what you thought of this post. Have an amazing day, guys!

The Graffiti Culture

Hi readers,

Graffiti is a controversial topic and a widely infamous form of expression which, interestingly, falls awkwardly in between the two categories of ‘art’ and ‘vandalism’. It’s one of those unsolvable, continuing,  Möbius strip-like subjects that have people fervently arguing on both ends. While graffiti is respected and even preserved sometimes as pieces of original artwork in some places, in others, it’s degraded and frowned upon as a crime.

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Graffiti originated in New York, but there’s evidence of ancient ‘graffiti'(more like ‘wall paintings’ back then) in Rome, Italy, and also from ancient times. Graffiti has developed/is developing rapidly. Ever since graffiti became acknowledged as a renowned art category by some people, the graffiti culture has been thriving, and is spewing out newly established artists and graffiti art platforms every year. (I don’t see much in Korea though… I don’t think it’s as prevalent here as an urban art form or as a social issue.)

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(image above: Graffiti artist Lee Quinones.)

“Graffiti is art and if art is a crime, please God, forgive me” – Lee Quinones

Lee Quinones is one of the rising artists involved in the New York City Subway graffiti movement. Here are some of the comments on Lee’s video about art on the Khan Academy website.

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(image above: comments from https://www.khanacademy.org/partner-content/MoMA/moma-artist-interviews/v/moma-lee-quinones)

The collision of viewpoints on the issue is interesting. While graffiti does definitely have merit as art, in a way it’s also destroying someone else’s art(the building). So how should the logic work? I think it depends on where your personal values lie. We’re not yet completely sure whether graffiti should be a severe crime or a harmless antic, but one thing we do know for sure is that it’s becoming more and more pervasive, and it’s unstoppable.

In fact, graffiti can be seen almost anywhere in the world, sometimes in the most seemingly impossible places. 

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(Yeah, I know, seriously-how did they do that?! )

As you can see, graffiti can exist on wherever and whatever we, the human race, can get our hands on. Since it’s such a widespread issue, even TV series like Switched at Birth or 90210 feature graffiti as a thought-provoking topic. Graffiti also makes frequent appearances in music videos or as backgrounds of urban magazine fashion shoots.

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(image above: from Switched at Birth, ABC Family.)

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(image above: 90210, The CW. Ivy and Diego’s graffiti wall.)

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(image above: fashion photoshoot from http://www.carlton-photography.co.uk/carlton-photography-blog/a-fashion-photography-shoot-northern-quarter-manchester-graffiti-and-snow/)

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(image above: from the music video of ‘Ugly’ by 2NE1.)

I remember my mother saying “This music video beautifies graffiti too much.” while we were watching 2NE1’s music video for ‘Ugly’. And I remember thinking, “Mum, it’s just a music video! They’re trying to express freedom and rebellion, let them do what they have to do to let the message get through!” But at the same time I also felt uncomfortable because of my acknowledgement of mass media portraying a type of vandalism as merely cool and beautiful.

I’ve noticed that mass media targeted towards the younger generation depicts graffiti in a way that makes it seem artistic, cool, and even beautiful. In modern music, movies, TV etc.. graffiti represents youth, freedom, excitement, the art of the people, and ironically, exquisite crime. I think this is because younger people are usually more compelled to graffiti as an art form. It’s the youth that bears the role of being the rebellious rugby ball in society. It’s the youth that wander around the streets with their tousled hair and ripped jeans, excitedly looking for a nice wall to paint their heart out on.

Is it cool? I’m confused. The logical, brainy part of me says “That’s technically vandalism, and vandalism is a crime. Graffiti is childish and in a way, immoral.” And then the #YOLO, teenage, free-spirited part of me keeps popping up and shouting “IT’S REAL ART IN ITS MOST ORIGINAL FORM!! IT’S EXPRESSION AT ITS BEST!”

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Amid all this confusion, what I find the most intriguing about this strange art called graffiti is that in a lot of cases, the things written on the walls are actually very deep and thought-provoking, and the fact that these meaningful messages or implications are put on walls in the context of graffiti makes it even more artistic, in a certain way. For graffiti artists, the process and the actual deed of putting their art up, against social regulations, are indeed part of the art itself. This almost convinces me that graffiti should be considered as legit art, since it does what art should do-provoke people’s emotions and thoughts-and does it well, sometimes it expresses certain themes in a much more convincing way than it would have been if it were hanging on the wall of a posh art gallery.

What do YOU think?

Don’t forget to comment, like, and follow. To comment or like, just click on the title of this post, then scroll down. You’ll see the Like button and Comment box a the end of this post.

Image credits:

http://www.loveitsomuch.com/

Girl with a Pearl Earring Painting

Hey readers,

Today I found my finished oil painting-my altered version of Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring.

In my painting the ‘girl’ looks more like an old lady… I actually didn’t intend for her to look like that but I’m just telling everyone that I did it on purpose.  I painted the headscarf a greener shade than the original, because I thought it would contribute to a more mystical atmosphere. Her lips are painted pinker than the original. I wanted her to have a weird, modern edge.

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It didn’t turn out exactly as I had planned, but oh well. In my defense, I’m more of a watercolor person. This was the first time I had ever done a proper oil painting on a canvas. I guess it’s an okay-ish first try? Right..?!

Marilyn Monroe

A lot of things and people inspire me, and one of my biggest inspirations for art is Marilyn Monroe. The best thing about her is that she was bold. She didn’t have to alter her true self to become the sexy, glamorous film icon that she was/is. She represents the 1940s femme fatale scene, which I personally love.

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A piece that I created by scratching the black surface of the board to reveal the bronze-coloured metal underneath.
I intended for it to resemble Andy Warhol’s pop art piece of Marilyn(the one that accentuates her bold facial features).